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  • NIH says Commonly used Antibiotic shows Promise for Combating Zika Infections

    NIH says Commonly used Antibiotic shows Promise for Combating Zika Infections

    National Institutes of Health says Commonly used Antibiotic shows Promise for Combating Zika Infections | site |


    NIH preclinical study suggests FDA-approved tetracycline-based antibiotics may slow infection and reduce neurological problems.


    (Information contained in National Institutes of Health [NIH] press release: November 24, 2020)

    In 2015, hundreds of children were born with brain deformities resulting from a global outbreak of Zika virus infections. Recently, National Institutes of Health researchers used a variety of advanced drug screening techniques to test out more than 10,000 compounds in search of a cure. To their surprise, they found that the widely used antibiotic methacycline was effective at preventing brain infections and reducing neurological problems associated with the virus in mice. In addition, they found that drugs originally designed to combat Alzheimer’s disease and inflammation may also help fight infections. â...
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  • Decades of National Institutes of Health Research help lead to first FDA-approved Treatment for Progeria

    Decades of National Institutes of Health Research help lead to first FDA-approved Treatment for Progeria | site |


    (Information included in a National Institutes of Health [NIH] news release media advisory: November 23, 2020)

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the first treatment for progeria, a rare and fatal pediatric disease, characterized by dramatic, rapid aging beginning in childhood. The treatment was made possible thanks in part to work at the National Institutes of Health over nearly two decades to identify and understand the function of the mutant gene and the protein it encodes (called progerin), with the goal of identifying new therapeutic drugs for the disorder. Progeria, also known as Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome, is a rare, multisystemic disease that causes premature aging and premature death in children. Progeria is caused by a genetic mutation in the LMNA (“lamin A”) gene, which helps maintain the normal
    ...
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  • National Institutes of Health says Cardiac Arrest Treatment that uses Life Support Machine boosts Survival

    National Institutes of Health says Cardiac Arrest Treatment that uses Life Support Machine boosts Survival | site |


    (November 13, 2020) - - Today the National Institutes of Health (NIH) published the following information:

    Using a life support machine to replicate the functions of the heart and lungs significantly improved the survival of people who suffered from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, according to a new study published today in The Lancet . The treatment program involving the life support machine called extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) proved so much more effective than the standard treatment for this usually fatal condition that the trial was stopped early after enrolling just 30 of the expected 165 patients. The study, known as the Advanced Reperfusion Strategies for Refractory Cardiac Arrest (ARREST) trial, was funded by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), part of the National Institutes of Health. It found th
    ...
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  • National Institutes of Health Question and Answer conference on COVID-19 Vaccine Research

    National Institutes of Health Question and Answer conference on COVID-19 Vaccine Research | site |



    An Update on COVID-19 Vaccines featuring Drs. Francis Collins and Anthony Fauci


    (October 29, 2020) - - On October 29, 2020 National Institutes of Health (NIH) officials discussed COVID-19 Vaccine Research. The video conference is available at https://youtu.be/rDT1WrzHWH8 or press HERE



    Credit: NIH...
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  • NIH says Hydroxychloroquine does not benefit Adults Hospitalized with COVID-19

    NIH says Hydroxychloroquine does not benefit Adults Hospitalized with COVID-19

    National Institutes of Health says Hydroxychloroquine does not benefit Adults Hospitalized with COVID-19 | site |



    (November 9, 2020) - - Today the National Institutes of Health (NIH) published the following information:

    A National Institutes of Health clinical trial evaluating the safety and effectiveness of hydroxychloroquine for the treatment of adults with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has formally concluded that the drug provides no clinical benefit to hospitalized patients. Though found not to cause harm, early findings in June when the trial was stopped indicated that the drug was not improving outcomes in COVID-19 patients. Final data and analyses of
    ...
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  • NIH says the Gut trains the Immune System to Protect the Brain

    NIH says the Gut trains the Immune System to Protect the Brain

    National Institutes of Health says the Gut trains the Immune System to Protect the Brain| site |



    Gut-trained immune cells at CNS borders guard against meningitis and other infections.


    (November 5, 2020) - - Today, November 5, 2020, the National Institutes of Health published the following information: The membranes surrounding our brains are in a never-ending battle against deadly infections, as germs constantly try to elude watchful immune cells and sneak past a special protective barrier called the meninges. In a study involving mice and human autopsy tissue, researchers at the National Institutes of Health and Cambridge University have shown that some of these immune cells are trained to fight these infections by first spending time in the gut. “This finding opens a new area of neuroimmunology, showing that gut-educated antibody-producing cells inhabit and defend regions that surround the central nervous system,” said Dorian McGavern, P...
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  • Statement—NIH-Sponsored ACTIV-3 Trial Closes LY-CoV555 Sub-Study

    Statement—NIH-Sponsored ACTIV-3 Trial Closes LY-CoV555 Sub-Study

    Statement — National Institutes of Health-Sponsored ACTIV-3 Trial Closes LY-CoV555 Sub-Study | site |



    (October 26, 2020) - - Today, October 26, 2020, the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases published the following information:



    Statement—NIH-Sponsored ACTIV-3 Trial Closes LY-CoV555 Sub-Study



    The ACTIV-3 clinical trial evaluating the investigational monoclonal antibody LY-CoV555 in hospitalized patients with COVID-19 will not enroll more participants into this sub-study following a recommendation from the independent Data and Safety Monitoring Board (DSMB). The trial is sponsored by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health. ACTIV-3 is a master protocol designed to allow for the study of multiple investigational agents compared to placebo in adults hospitalized with COVID-19. Participants in the trial are randomly as...
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  • NIH says Study discovers Gene that Helps us Know When it’s Time to Urinate

    National Institutes of Health says Study discovers Gene that Helps us Know When it’s Time to Urinate | site |




    (October 19, 2020) - - Today, October 19, 2020, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) published the following information:

    In a National Institutes of Health-funded study involving both mice and patients who are part of an NIH Clinical Center trial, researchers discovered that a gene, called PIEZO2, may be responsible for the powerful urge to urinate that we normally feel several times a day. The results, published in Nature, suggest that the gene helps at least two different types of cells in the body sense when our bladders are full and need to be emptied. These results also
    ...
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  • NIH Study aims to Identify promising COVID-19 Treatments for larger Clinical Trials

    National Institutes of Health Study aims to Identify promising COVID-19 Treatments for larger Clinical Trials | site |



    (October 13, 2020) - - Today, the National Institutes of Health published the following information:

    The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health, today launched a study designed to determine whether certain approved therapies or investigational drugs in late-stage clinical development show




    This scanning electron microscope image shows SARS-CoV-2 (round gold objects) emerging from the surface of cells cultured in the lab. SARS-CoV-2, also known as 2019-nCoV, is the virus that causes COVID-19. The virus shown was isolated from a patient in the U.S.
    Graphic courtesy NIAID

    promise against COVID-19 and merit...
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  • National Institutes of Health to Assess and Expand COVID-19 Testing for Underserved Communities

    National Institutes of Health to Assess and Expand COVID-19 Testing for Underserved Communities | site |



    (September 30, 2020) - - Today, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) published the following information:

    The National Institutes of Health has awarded nearly $234 million to improve COVID-19 testing for underserved and vulnerable populations. A part of the Rapid Acceleration of Diagnostics (RADx) initiative, the RADx Underserved Populations (RADx-UP) program will support 32 institutions across the United States and will focus on populations disproportionately affected by the pandemic. These groups include African Americans, American Indians/Alaskan Natives, Latinos/Latinas, Native Hawaiians, older adults, pregnant women and those who are homeless or incarcerated. “It is critical that all Americans have access to rapid, accurate diagnostics for COVID-19, especially underserved and vulnerable populations who are bearing the brunt of th
    ...
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  • NIH expands Clinical Trials to Test Convalescent Plasma against COVID-19

    National Institutes of Health expands Clinical Trials to Test Convalescent Plasma against COVID-19 | site |


    Rigorous studies to build on earlier efforts to test the experimental treatment


    (September 22, 2020) - - Today the National Institutes of Health published the following information: Two randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trials funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) are expanding enrollment to further evaluate convalescent plasma as a treatment for patients hospitalized with COVID-19. Preliminary observational studies indicate that convalescent plasma may improve outcomes among severely ill and hospitalized patients with COVID-19. Prospective, well-controlled randomized trials are needed to generate sufficient data on whether convalescent plasma is effective and safe for the treatment of COVID-19. Convalescent plasma is blood plasma taken from people who have recovered from COVID-19. It contains antibodies that can recognize and
    ...
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  • NIH Funds Community Engagement Research Efforts in Areas Hardest Hit by COVID-19

    National Institutes of Health Funds Community Engagement Research Efforts in Areas Hardest Hit by COVID-19 | site |




    (September 16, 2020) - - Today, September 16, 2020, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) published the following information:

    The National Institutes of Health today announced a $12 million award for outreach and engagement efforts in ethnic and racial minority communities disproportionately affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. The award to RTI International, a non-profit research institution, will support teams in 11 states established as part of the NIH Community Engagement Alliance (CEAL) Against COVID-19 Disparities. These teams have received initial funding to immediately create CEAL programs, and RTI will serve as the Technical and Administrative Support and Coordination (TASC) center.


    The CEAL research teams will focus on COVID-19 awareness and education research, especially among African Americans,
    ...
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  • National Institutes of Health Shifts non-mission-critical Laboratory Operations to Minimal Maintenance Phase

    National Institutes of Health Shifts non-mission-critical Laboratory Operations to Minimal Maintenance Phase | site |




    (March 20, 2020) - - Today (March 20, 2020), the National Institutes of Health (NIH) published the following information: To further reduce the risk of transmission of COVID-19 and enhance the safety of staff, the National Institutes of Health is shifting all non-mission-critical laboratory operations to a maintenance phase. Beginning on Monday, March 23, only mission-critical functions within NIH research laboratories will be supported. Mission-critical functions include the following: care of research participants in NIH clinical protocols that are non-elective, research directly on COVID-19, urgent public health research recommended by NIH scientific leadership, work involving significant research investments that could be lost if not continued, and protection of life, property and resources, including the care of research animals. Th...
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  • National Institutes of Health Clinical Trial of Investigational Vaccine for COVID-19 begins

    National Institutes of Health Clinical Trial of Investigational Vaccine for COVID-19 begins| site |


    Study enrolling Seattle-based healthy adult volunteers.


    (March 16, 2020) - - Today (March 16, 2020), the National Institutes of Health (NIH) published the following information:

    A Phase 1 clinical trial evaluating an investigational vaccine designed to protect against coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has begun at Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute (KPWHRI) in Seattle. The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health, is funding the trial. KPWHRI is part of NIAID’s Infectious Diseases Clinical Research Consortium. The open-label trial will enroll 45 healthy adult volunteers ages 18 to 55 years over approximately 6 weeks. The first participant received the investigational vaccine today. The study is evaluating different doses of the experimental vaccine for
    ...
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  • National Institutes of Health Reports First Known Employee with COVID-19 Infection

    National Institutes of Health Reports First Known Employee with COVID-19 Infection| site |



    (March 15, 2020) - - Today (March 15, 2020), the National Institutes of Health (NIH) published the following information: NIH informed its staff early this morning that it has its first known case of an NIH staff member who has tested positive for COVID-19, the disease caused by the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus. NIH has reported the case to state and local public health officials. While this is an unfortunate development, it is not surprising, and NIH expects that there will be more cases of infection among NIH staff. The individual works for the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases but is not involved in patient care. The individual is quarantined at home and doing well. Importantly, the individual was asymptomatic while at work, which is believed to lower the risk of transmission. After developing symptoms, the individual took the appropriate ac
    ...
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  • Staff Reporter 1
    NIH says Commonly used Antibiotic shows Promise for Combating Zika Infections
    by Staff Reporter 1
    National Institutes of Health says Commonly used Antibiotic shows Promise for Combating Zika Infections | site |


    NIH preclinical study suggests FDA-approved tetracycline-based antibiotics may slow infection and reduce neurological problems.


    (Information contained in National Institutes of Health [NIH] press release: November 24, 2020)

    In 2015, hundreds of children were born with brain deformities resulting from a global outbreak of Zika virus infections. Recently, National Institutes of Health researchers used a variety of advanced drug screening techniques to test out more than 10,000 compounds in search of a cure. To their surprise, they found that the widely used antibiotic methacycline was effective at preventing brain infections and reducing neurological problems associated with the virus in mice. In addition, they found that drugs originally designed to combat Alzheimer’s disease and inflammation may also help fight infections. â...
    11-24-2020, 08:57 PM
  • Staff Reporter 1
    Decades of National Institutes of Health Research help lead to first FDA-approved Treatment for Progeria
    by Staff Reporter 1
    Decades of National Institutes of Health Research help lead to first FDA-approved Treatment for Progeria | site |


    (Information included in a National Institutes of Health [NIH] news release media advisory: November 23, 2020)

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the first treatment for progeria, a rare and fatal pediatric disease, characterized by dramatic, rapid aging beginning in childhood. The treatment was made possible thanks in part to work at the National Institutes of Health over nearly two decades to identify and understand the function of the mutant gene and the protein it encodes (called progerin), with the goal of identifying new therapeutic drugs for the disorder. Progeria, also known as Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome, is a rare, multisystemic disease that causes premature aging and premature death in children. Progeria is caused by a genetic mutation in the LMNA (“lamin A”) gene, which helps maintain the normal
    ...
    11-24-2020, 04:11 AM
  • Staff Reporter 1
    National Institutes of Health says Cardiac Arrest Treatment that uses Life Support Machine boosts Survival
    by Staff Reporter 1
    National Institutes of Health says Cardiac Arrest Treatment that uses Life Support Machine boosts Survival | site |


    (November 13, 2020) - - Today the National Institutes of Health (NIH) published the following information:

    Using a life support machine to replicate the functions of the heart and lungs significantly improved the survival of people who suffered from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, according to a new study published today in The Lancet . The treatment program involving the life support machine called extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) proved so much more effective than the standard treatment for this usually fatal condition that the trial was stopped early after enrolling just 30 of the expected 165 patients. The study, known as the Advanced Reperfusion Strategies for Refractory Cardiac Arrest (ARREST) trial, was funded by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), part of the National Institutes of Health. It found th
    ...
    11-13-2020, 07:54 PM
  • Staff Reporter 1
    National Institutes of Health Question and Answer conference on COVID-19 Vaccine Research
    by Staff Reporter 1
    National Institutes of Health Question and Answer conference on COVID-19 Vaccine Research | site |



    An Update on COVID-19 Vaccines featuring Drs. Francis Collins and Anthony Fauci


    (October 29, 2020) - - On October 29, 2020 National Institutes of Health (NIH) officials discussed COVID-19 Vaccine Research. The video conference is available at https://youtu.be/rDT1WrzHWH8 or press HERE



    Credit: NIH...
    11-10-2020, 05:07 PM
  • Staff Reporter 1
    NIH says Hydroxychloroquine does not benefit Adults Hospitalized with COVID-19
    by Staff Reporter 1
    National Institutes of Health says Hydroxychloroquine does not benefit Adults Hospitalized with COVID-19 | site |



    (November 9, 2020) - - Today the National Institutes of Health (NIH) published the following information:

    A National Institutes of Health clinical trial evaluating the safety and effectiveness of hydroxychloroquine for the treatment of adults with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has formally concluded that the drug provides no clinical benefit to hospitalized patients. Though found not to cause harm, early findings in June when the trial was stopped indicated that the drug was not improving outcomes in COVID-19 patients. Final data and analyses of
    ...
    11-09-2020, 09:58 PM

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