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  • NIH’s TOPMed program publishes Data on over 53,000 diverse Genomes

    NIH’s TOPMed program publishes Data on over 53,000 diverse Genomes

    National Institutes of Health’s TOPMed program publishes Data on over 53,000 diverse Genomes | site |



    NIH says historic findings could boost precision medicine, reduce health disparities


    (Information contained in National Institutes of Health [NIH] press release dated: February 10, 2021)

    Researchers supported by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), part of the National Institutes of Health, announced the publication of a groundbreaking study which analyzed more than 53,000 whole genomes, primarily from minority populations. The study, which appears in the Feb. 10 online issue of the journal Nature, examines one of the largest and most diverse data sets of high-quality whole genome sequencing—a person’s complete set of DNA. The genetic data could shed new light on how heart, lung, blood, and sleep disorders impact people with diverse racial and ethnic backgrounds, who often are underrepresented in genetic
    ...
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  • NIH calls for greater inclusion of Pregnant and Lactating People in COVID-19 Vaccine Research

    National Institutes of Health calls for greater inclusion of Pregnant and Lactating People in COVID-19 Vaccine Research | site |



    (Information contained in National Institutes of Health [NIH] press releases: February 10, 2021)

    Longstanding obstacles to include pregnant and lactating people in clinical research have led to this population now deciding whether or not to receive a SARS-CoV-2 vaccine without the benefit of scientific evidence, writes Diana W. Bianchi, M.D., director of the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), part of the National Institutes of Health, and colleagues. Their viewpoint article appears online in JAMA. The manufacturers of currently available vaccines excluded pregnant and lactating people from the clinical trials needed to obtain Emergency Use Authorizations from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Now that the vaccines have been distributed, the U.S. Center
    ...
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  • National Institutes of Health Networks to Advance Emotional Well-being Research

    National Institutes of Health Networks to Advance Emotional Well-being Research

    National Institutes of Health Networks to Advance Emotional Well-being Research | site |



    (Information contained in National Institutes of Health [NIH] press release dated: February 1, 2021)

    Five new research networks totaling $3.13 million in funding from the National Institutes of Health will allow investigators to refine and test key concepts that advance the study of emotional well-being. Emotional well-being has been defined as an overall positive state of one’s emotions, life satisfaction, sense of meaning and purpose, and ability to pursue self-defined goals. The opportunity to research emotional well-being and its core components — a sense of balance in emotion, thoughts, social relationships, and pursuits — aligns with NIH’s broader objectives of fostering health promotion and disease prevention. For example, having a sense of purpose in life has been shown to reduce the risk of heart attack and stroke. These research networks, f...
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  • National Institutes of Health Officials Highlight COVID-19 Vaccine Facts, Unknowns for Healthcare Providers

    National Institutes of Health Officials Highlight COVID-19 Vaccine Facts, Unknowns for Healthcare Providers | site |



    (Information included in a National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) news release dated: January 18, 2021)

    Healthcare providers must be able to explain the latest data supporting the safety and efficacy of vaccines for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) so they can strongly encourage vaccination when appropriate while acknowledging that uncertainty and unknowns remain. This message comes from a new commentary co-authored by Anthony S. Fauci, M.D., director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health, and other leading NIAID scientists in the journal Annals of Internal Medicine. The commentary provides an overview of the seven COVID-19 vaccines furthest along in development in the United States. For each vaccine candidate, the authors des
    ...
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  • NIH Scientists identify Nutrient that helps prevent Bacterial Infection

    NIH Scientists identify Nutrient that helps prevent Bacterial Infection

    National Institutes of Health Scientists identify Nutrient that helps prevent Bacterial Infection | site |



    Taurine, which helps the body digest fats and oils, could offer treatment benefit.



    (Information contained in National Institutes of Health [NIH] press release: January 15, 2021)

    Scientists studying the body’s natural defenses against bacterial infection have identified a nutrient — taurine — that helps the gut recall prior infections and kill invading bacteria, such as Klebsiella pneumoniae (Kpn). The finding, published in the journal Cell by scientists from five institutes of the National Institutes of Health, could aid efforts seeking alternatives to antibiotics. Scientists know that microbiota — the trillions of beneficial microbes living harmoniously inside our gut — can protect people from bacterial infections, but little is known about how they provide protection. Scientists are studying the microbiota ...
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  • NIH Scientists Study Salmonella Swimming Behavior as Clues to Infection

    NIH Scientists Study Salmonella Swimming Behavior as Clues to Infection

    National Institutes of Health Scientists Study Salmonella Swimming Behavior as Clues to Infection | site |


    (Information contained in National Institutes of Health [NIH] press release: January 13, 2021)

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium bacteria (S. Typhimurium) commonly cause human gastroenteritis, inflammation of the lining of the intestines. The bacteria live inside the gut and can infect the epithelial cells that line its surface. Many studies have shown that Salmonella use a “run-and-tumble” method of short swimming periods (runs) punctuated by tumbles when they randomly change direction, but how they move within the gut is not well understood.



    Salmonella bacteria (pink), a common cause of foodborne disease, invade a human epithelial cell (yellow). Courtesy: NIH/NIAID


    National Institutes...
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  • National Institutes of Health says Peer-reviewed Report on Moderna COVID-19 Vaccine Publishes

    National Institutes of Health says Peer-reviewed Report on Moderna COVID-19 Vaccine Publishes | site |



    NIH says "Data from Phase 3 clinical trial confirm vaccine is effective".


    (Information contained in National Institutes of Health [NIH] press release dated: December 30, 2020)

    The investigational vaccine known as mRNA-1273 was 94.1% efficacious in preventing symptomatic coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), according to preliminary results from a Phase 3 clinical trial reported in the New England Journal of Medicine. The vaccine also demonstrated efficacy in preventing severe COVID-19. Investigators identified no safety concerns and no evidence of vaccine-associated enhanced respiratory disease (VAERD). The vaccine was co-developed by Moderna, Inc., a biotechnology company based in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health. ...
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  • NIH publishes Statement on the FDA Emeregency Use Authorization of the Moderna COVID-19 Vaccine

    National Institutes of Health publishes Statement on the FDA Emergency Use Authorization of the Moderna COVID-19 Vaccine| site |


    (The following is information contained in a National Institutes of Health [NIH] press release dated: December 18, 2020)


    Statement from NIH and BARDA on the FDA Emergency Use Authorization of the Moderna COVID-19 Vaccine


    Today, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration issued an Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) to Moderna, Inc., a biotechnology company based in Cambridge, Massachusetts, for its COVID-19 vaccine, which was co-developed with scientists at the National Institutes of Health's National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID). This innovative and monumental partnership has enabled NIH and Moderna to develop a safe and effective COVID-19 vaccine within the span of a year that will be manufactured and distributed across the U.S. The vaccine, called mRNA-1273, is a messenger...
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  • National Institutes of Health says Baricitinib plus Remdesivir shows Promise for Treating COVID-19

    National Institutes of Health says Baricitinib plus Remdesivir shows Promise for Treating COVID-19 | site |


    NIH says "Peer-reviewed results of NIH clinical trial published".


    (Information contained in National Institutes of Health [NIH] press release media advisory: December 11, 2020)

    The combination of baricitinib, an anti-inflammatory drug, and remdesivir, an antiviral, reduced time to recovery for people hospitalized with COVID-19, according to clinical trial results published in the New England Journal of Medicine. The study was supported by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health. The clinical trial is the second iteration of the NIH Adaptive COVID-19 Treatment Trial (ACTT-2), a study protocol to evaluate therapeutics for people hospitalized with COVID-19. Remdesivir is a broad-spectrum antiviral treatment developed by Gilead Sciences, Inc. Baricitinib was discove
    ...
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  • National Institutes of Health-funded Tool helps Organizations Plan COVID-19 Testing

    National Institutes of Health-funded Tool helps Organizations Plan COVID-19 Testing
    | site |


    Online calculator computes costs of testing and offers strategies for preventing infections in schools and businesses.


    (Information contained in National Institutes of Health [NIH] press release: December 7, 2020) It can be an enormous challenge for schools and businesses to determine how to establish an effective COVID-19 testing program, particularly with the multiple testing options now on the market. An innovative online tool funded by the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB), part of the National Institutes of Health, helps organizations choose a COVID-19 testing strategy that will work best for their specific needs. The COVID-19 Testing Impact Calculator is a free resource that shows how different approaches to testing and other mitigation measures, such as mask use, can curb the spread of the virus in any orga...
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  • NIH says Fourth Iteration of COVID-19 Treatment Trial underway

    NIH says Fourth Iteration of COVID-19 Treatment Trial underway

    National Institutes of Health says Fourth Iteration of COVID-19 Treatment Trial underway| site |


    (Information contained in National Institutes of Health [NIH] press release: November 25, 2020) The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), one of the National Institutes of Health, today announced that the fourth iteration of the Adaptive COVID-19 Treatment Trial (ACTT-4) has begun to enroll hospitalized adults with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) who require supplemental oxygen. The NIAID-sponsored trial will enroll up to 1,500 patients at approximately 100 sites in the United States and other countries. Participants will be assigned at random to one of two treatment arms of equal size. One group will receive both dexamethasone, a corticosteroid available as a generic drug, and remdesivir, a broad-spectrum antiviral discovered and developed by Gilead Sciences, Inc., of Foster City, California. Remdesivir, also known as Veklury, was r...
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  • NIH says Commonly used Antibiotic shows Promise for Combating Zika Infections

    NIH says Commonly used Antibiotic shows Promise for Combating Zika Infections

    National Institutes of Health says Commonly used Antibiotic shows Promise for Combating Zika Infections | site |


    NIH preclinical study suggests FDA-approved tetracycline-based antibiotics may slow infection and reduce neurological problems.


    (Information contained in National Institutes of Health [NIH] press release: November 24, 2020)

    In 2015, hundreds of children were born with brain deformities resulting from a global outbreak of Zika virus infections. Recently, National Institutes of Health researchers used a variety of advanced drug screening techniques to test out more than 10,000 compounds in search of a cure. To their surprise, they found that the widely used antibiotic methacycline was effective at preventing brain infections and reducing neurological problems associated with the virus in mice. In addition, they found that drugs originally designed to combat Alzheimer’s disease and inflammation may also help fight infections. ...
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  • Decades of National Institutes of Health Research help lead to first FDA-approved Treatment for Progeria

    Decades of National Institutes of Health Research help lead to first FDA-approved Treatment for Progeria | site |


    (Information included in a National Institutes of Health [NIH] news release media advisory: November 23, 2020)

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the first treatment for progeria, a rare and fatal pediatric disease, characterized by dramatic, rapid aging beginning in childhood. The treatment was made possible thanks in part to work at the National Institutes of Health over nearly two decades to identify and understand the function of the mutant gene and the protein it encodes (called progerin), with the goal of identifying new therapeutic drugs for the disorder. Progeria, also known as Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome, is a rare, multisystemic disease that causes premature aging and premature death in children. Progeria is caused by a genetic mutation in the LMNA (“lamin A”) gene, which helps maintain the normal
    ...
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  • National Institutes of Health says Cardiac Arrest Treatment that uses Life Support Machine boosts Survival

    National Institutes of Health says Cardiac Arrest Treatment that uses Life Support Machine boosts Survival | site |


    (November 13, 2020) - - Today the National Institutes of Health (NIH) published the following information:

    Using a life support machine to replicate the functions of the heart and lungs significantly improved the survival of people who suffered from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, according to a new study published today in The Lancet . The treatment program involving the life support machine called extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) proved so much more effective than the standard treatment for this usually fatal condition that the trial was stopped early after enrolling just 30 of the expected 165 patients. The study, known as the Advanced Reperfusion Strategies for Refractory Cardiac Arrest (ARREST) trial, was funded by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), part of the National Institutes of Health. It found th
    ...
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  • National Institutes of Health Question and Answer conference on COVID-19 Vaccine Research

    National Institutes of Health Question and Answer conference on COVID-19 Vaccine Research | site |



    An Update on COVID-19 Vaccines featuring Drs. Francis Collins and Anthony Fauci


    (October 29, 2020) - - On October 29, 2020 National Institutes of Health (NIH) officials discussed COVID-19 Vaccine Research. The video conference is available at https://youtu.be/rDT1WrzHWH8 or press HERE



    Credit: NIH...
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  • Staff Reporter 1
    NIH’s TOPMed program publishes Data on over 53,000 diverse Genomes
    by Staff Reporter 1
    National Institutes of Health’s TOPMed program publishes Data on over 53,000 diverse Genomes | site |



    NIH says historic findings could boost precision medicine, reduce health disparities


    (Information contained in National Institutes of Health [NIH] press release dated: February 10, 2021)

    Researchers supported by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), part of the National Institutes of Health, announced the publication of a groundbreaking study which analyzed more than 53,000 whole genomes, primarily from minority populations. The study, which appears in the Feb. 10 online issue of the journal Nature, examines one of the largest and most diverse data sets of high-quality whole genome sequencing—a person’s complete set of DNA. The genetic data could shed new light on how heart, lung, blood, and sleep disorders impact people with diverse racial and ethnic backgrounds, who often are underrepresented in genetic
    ...
    02-10-2021, 08:07 PM
  • Staff Reporter 1
    NIH calls for greater inclusion of Pregnant and Lactating People in COVID-19 Vaccine Research
    by Staff Reporter 1
    National Institutes of Health calls for greater inclusion of Pregnant and Lactating People in COVID-19 Vaccine Research | site |



    (Information contained in National Institutes of Health [NIH] press releases: February 10, 2021)

    Longstanding obstacles to include pregnant and lactating people in clinical research have led to this population now deciding whether or not to receive a SARS-CoV-2 vaccine without the benefit of scientific evidence, writes Diana W. Bianchi, M.D., director of the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), part of the National Institutes of Health, and colleagues. Their viewpoint article appears online in JAMA. The manufacturers of currently available vaccines excluded pregnant and lactating people from the clinical trials needed to obtain Emergency Use Authorizations from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Now that the vaccines have been distributed, the U.S. Center
    ...
    02-10-2021, 06:08 PM
  • Staff Reporter 1
    National Institutes of Health Networks to Advance Emotional Well-being Research
    by Staff Reporter 1
    National Institutes of Health Networks to Advance Emotional Well-being Research | site |



    (Information contained in National Institutes of Health [NIH] press release dated: February 1, 2021)

    Five new research networks totaling $3.13 million in funding from the National Institutes of Health will allow investigators to refine and test key concepts that advance the study of emotional well-being. Emotional well-being has been defined as an overall positive state of one’s emotions, life satisfaction, sense of meaning and purpose, and ability to pursue self-defined goals. The opportunity to research emotional well-being and its core components — a sense of balance in emotion, thoughts, social relationships, and pursuits — aligns with NIH’s broader objectives of fostering health promotion and disease prevention. For example, having a sense of purpose in life has been shown to reduce the risk of heart attack and stroke. These research networks, f...
    02-03-2021, 11:21 PM
  • Staff Reporter 1
    National Institutes of Health Officials Highlight COVID-19 Vaccine Facts, Unknowns for Healthcare Providers
    by Staff Reporter 1
    National Institutes of Health Officials Highlight COVID-19 Vaccine Facts, Unknowns for Healthcare Providers | site |



    (Information included in a National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) news release dated: January 18, 2021)

    Healthcare providers must be able to explain the latest data supporting the safety and efficacy of vaccines for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) so they can strongly encourage vaccination when appropriate while acknowledging that uncertainty and unknowns remain. This message comes from a new commentary co-authored by Anthony S. Fauci, M.D., director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health, and other leading NIAID scientists in the journal Annals of Internal Medicine. The commentary provides an overview of the seven COVID-19 vaccines furthest along in development in the United States. For each vaccine candidate, the authors des
    ...
    01-21-2021, 03:03 PM
  • Staff Reporter 1
    NIH Scientists identify Nutrient that helps prevent Bacterial Infection
    by Staff Reporter 1
    National Institutes of Health Scientists identify Nutrient that helps prevent Bacterial Infection | site |



    Taurine, which helps the body digest fats and oils, could offer treatment benefit.



    (Information contained in National Institutes of Health [NIH] press release: January 15, 2021)

    Scientists studying the body’s natural defenses against bacterial infection have identified a nutrient — taurine — that helps the gut recall prior infections and kill invading bacteria, such as Klebsiella pneumoniae (Kpn). The finding, published in the journal Cell by scientists from five institutes of the National Institutes of Health, could aid efforts seeking alternatives to antibiotics. Scientists know that microbiota — the trillions of beneficial microbes living harmoniously inside our gut — can protect people from bacterial infections, but little is known about how they provide protection. Scientists are studying the microbiota ...
    01-15-2021, 06:43 PM

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